Indigenous Peoples’ Day is observed in the United States to honor native peoples the Americas and celebrate their histories and cultures. This U.S. holiday emerged in recent years as a rejection of the erasure of Indigenous peoples from their history. To amplify the humanistic work and contributions of Indigenous studies scholars, we recently asked members of the ACLS community to share resources and work on this area of study.

The following list represents existing readings, research, curricula, published works, and other resources on humanistic work from and submitted by ACLS fellows focusing on the insights, histories, and experiences of peoples native to the Americas.

Similar to the previous published sections of scholarly writing and resources on race and racismLGBTQ+ liberation, and Hispanic/Latinx Studies, these resources are part of our ongoing commitment to and efforts in inclusive excellence and our continued efforts to promote humanistic scholarship in the public eye.

“The humanities and social sciences will not thrive unless they reflect the diversity of the experiences they seek to interpret,” stated ACLS President Joy Connolly. At ACLS, we are dedicated to doing the continuous work of dismantling the biases within academia and positioning these areas of studies as intrinsic to the value of the humanities.

If you have any resources you would like to share with the ACLS community, or any questions or comments, please connect with us at [email protected].

INDIGENOUS YOUTH ACTIVISM IN MEXICO

GENOA INDIAN SCHOOL DIGITAL RECONCILIATION PROJECT

RECONCILIATION RISING

RESOURCE LIST ON INDIGENOUS STUDIES

BLACKNESS AND INDIGENEITY

INFLUENZA PANDEMIC OF 1918-1919 AND INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN THE UNITED STATES

BORDERS, IMMIGRATION, AND INDIGENOUS PEOPLES IN THE AMERICAS

NEOCOLONIALISM AND INDIGENOUS PEOPLE IN THE AMERICAS

AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY

NATIVE AMERICAN AND INDIGENOUS STUDIES

WHY INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY?

NATIVE AMERICAN AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORIES

ACLS DIGITAL EXTENSION COLLABORATIVE PROJECT TO PRODUCE NEW CRITICAL EDITION OF THE FRANZ BOAS AND GEORGE HUNT 1897 ETHNOGRAPHY ON THE KWAKWAKA’WAKW PEOPLE