ACLS Digital Extension Grants

The ACLS Digital Extension Grant program supports digitally based research projects in all disciplines of the humanities and humanities-related social sciences. It is hoped that these grants will help advance the digital transformation of humanities scholarship by extending the reach of existing digital projects to new communities of users and by adding diversity to the digital record.

This program is made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Read more about this fellowship program.

Please note: affiliations shown are as of time of award. Please click on fellows' names for current information.

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Watch "Emerging Themes and Methods of Research: A Discussion with ACLS Fellows," an annual meeting session featuring recent ACLS fellows. 

  • Expanding the Corpus and Repository of Writing: An Archive of Multilingual Writing in English | Abstract

    Fueled by a network of scholars and teacher-researchers, this project expands the content, reach, and research options for the Corpus & Repository of Writing (Crow; writecrow.org), the first web-based archive integrating a corpus of English texts produced by undergraduate, multilingual writers with a repository of resources used to write those texts. The open source tool currently supports research and teaching of writing—intertextuality, genre, linguistic variation—through its browser and API-based method, and a machine-learning tool for analyzing intertextuality is under development. As content expands to include heritage Spanish writers from the University of Arizona, a Hispanic-serving institution, this project also will employ a model of team-based mentoring to train underrepresented scholars and teachers from high schools and community colleges.

    Bradley Dilger
    Bradley Dilger

    Associate Professor, English, Purdue University

    Shelley Staples
    Shelley Staples

    Associate Professor, English, University of Arizona

  • Globalizing and Enhancing the Media History Digital Library | Abstract

    The Media History Digital Library (MHDL, http://mediahistoryproject.org) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is a free online resource, featuring millions of pages of books and magazines from the histories of film, broadcasting, and recorded sound. To better serve researchers, the MHDL is developing a new platform that supports granular metadata, user contributions, and linked data with the AFI Catalog. This project also is expanding the MHDL’s international scope through the work of the Global Cinema History Task Force, a group of film historians who are investigating the locations and copyright statuses of significant global film publications and digitizing them when possible. The inclusion of more Spanish-language movie magazines is one of the project’s top priorities. To achieve this goal, the MHDL will be collaborating and hosting workshops with the Society for Cinema and Media Studies’ Latino/a Caucus and the University of Houston’s Recovering the US Hispanic Literary Heritage project.

    Kelley Conway
    Kelley Conway

    Professor, Communication Arts, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Eric Hoyt
    Eric Hoyt

    Associate Professor, Communication Arts, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  • New Storytellers: The Research Institute in Digital Ethnic Studies, Developing Racial, Ethnic, and Cultural Diversity in the Next Generation of Digital Scholars | Abstract

    Digital humanities has transformed how we study history and culture, but the field has thrived mainly at research universities and the wealthiest institutions. With New Storytellers, New Stories: The Research Institute in Digital Ethnic Studies we aim to engage those previously excluded from the field though an immersive institute. Our experience gained through ten years of hosting the Nebraska digital forum and our extensive engagement with faculty at minority serving institutions informs our approach. In seeking applicants for the institute, we will reach out in particular to minority serving institutions. By virtue of our ethnic studies focus and our target audiences we hope to extend the diversity of topics and participants in digital humanities.

    Joy Castro
    Joy Castro

    Professor, English and Ethnic Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

    Jeannette Eileen Jones
    Jeannette Eileen Jones

    Associate Professor, History and Ethnic Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

    Kenneth M. Price
    Kenneth M. Price

    Professor, English, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

    William G. Thomas
    William G. Thomas

    Professor, History, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

  • The AudiAnnotate Project | Abstract

    The AudiAnnotate Project will build on existing efforts by the HiPSTAS (High Performance Sound Technologies for Access and Scholarship) project and the Brumfield Labs to produce and share (1) a web application to help scholars to create IIIF-AV annotations; (2) documentation that describes three different use cases that leverage this workflow in scholarship on poetry performance recordings; and (3) a workshop for sharing this work. The developed application and workflows will help users to translate their own analyses of audio recordings into media annotations that will be publishable as easy-to-maintain, static, W3C Web Annotations associated with IIIF manifests and hosted in a GitHub repository that are viewable through presentation software. Local, national, and international partners include the Harry Ransom Center, the IIIF Consortium, and the SpokenWeb project.

    Tanya Clement
    Tanya Clement

    Associate Professor, English, University of Texas at Austin

  • Ticha: Advancing Community-Engaged Digital Scholarship | Abstract

    The Ticha Project (https://ticha.haverford.edu) is a digital text explorer for Zapotec language texts created during the Mexican Colonial period. This project propels Ticha forward through the creation of publicly available teaching modules targeted for use in high schools and colleges in both the United States and Mexico. The interdisciplinary team includes the PI (a linguist), Zapotec scholars and community members, and undergraduate students, who also work together to grow the resources available on Ticha, with an emphasis on Zapotec produced content. The community-engaged methods employed are also objects of study and reflection themselves, as the project explores questions of collaboration in digital scholarship and the intersection of collaborative digital scholarship with community-engaged research.

    Xochitl Flores-Marcial
    Xochitl Flores-Marcial

    Assistant Professor, Chicana/o Studies, California State University, Northridge

    Brook Danielle Lillehaugen
    Brook Danielle Lillehaugen

    Assistant Professor, Linguistics, Haverford College

    Felipe H. Lopez
    Felipe H. Lopez

    Independent Scholar

    Michael Zarafonetis
    Michael Zarafonetis

    Coordinator, Magill Library, Haverford College