• Benjamin_AM2013

    Watch ACLS Fellow Ruha Benjamin present her research at the 2013 annual meeting.

  • AM2013 Public Fellows

    ACLS Public Fellows with Nicole A. Stahlmann, former director of fellowships (third from right), and Program Officer John Paul Christy 

  • Bookcase_new

    Browse recent titles by ACLS fellows on Pinterest.

Valeria Manzano F'10, F'09, F'08

Valeria Manzano

Associate Professor
History
Universidad Nacional de San Martin
last updated: 09/12/13

ACLS New Faculty Fellows Program 2010
Ph.D., Latin American History, Indiana University, Bloomington
Dissertation: "The Making of Youth in Argentina: Culture, Politics, and Sexuality, 1958 - 1976"
Appointed in History at University of Chicago (January 2011 - December 2012)

Mellon/ACLS Recent Doctoral Recipients Fellowships 2009
Department: Latin American History
Indiana University, Bloomington
The Making of Youth in Argentina: Culture, Politics, and Sexuality, 1956-1976

This study shows how youth became a central discursive category and a crucial cultural and political actor in 1960s and 1970s Argentina. It demonstrates that middle- and working-class youths, albeit in different ways, became the bearers of an Argentine cultural modernization by creating new practices, spaces, and styles of sociability, and by reshaping the realm of consumption. As a consequence of this process, youths also transformed the ways of experiencing gender relations, changed sexual mores and practices, and re-conceptualized the meanings of eroticism. Youths likewise altered Argentine politics not only by creating and participating in youth political organizations but also by fostering a political culture of contestation that questioned the terms of citizenship and nationhood.

Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships 2008
Doctoral Candidate
Indiana University, Bloomington
The Making of Youth in Argentina: Culture, Politics, and Sexuality, 1958-1975

This dissertation studies how youth became a central cultural and political actor in 1960s and 1970s Argentina. It demonstrates that middle- and working-class young people, albeit in different ways, became the bearers of an Argentine cultural modernization by creating new practices, spaces, and styles of sociability, and by reshaping the realm of consumption. As a consequence of this process, young people also transformed the ways of experiencing gender relations and identities as well as radically changed sexual mores and practices. In addition, young people altered Argentine politics not only by creating and participating in youth political organizations but also by fostering a political culture of contestation that profoundly questioned the terms of citizenship and nationhood.