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Margaret D. Jacobs F'12

Margaret D. Jacobs

Chancellor's Professor of History
History
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
last updated: 06/16/16

ACLS Fellowship Program 2012
Professor
Department: History
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Where Have All the Children Gone? The Fostering and Adoption of American Indian Children in Non-Indian Families, 1880-1980

Beginning in the late 1950s, the US Bureau of Indian Affairs, state agencies, and private adoption organizations promoted the widespread fostering and adoption of American Indian children within non-Indian families. As a result, by 1969, in many states with large American Indian populations, 25-35% of Indian children had been removed from their families and either institutionalized, fostered, or placed for adoption in non-Indian families. At the same time, indigenous children in other British settler colonial nations also experienced elevated levels of fostering and adoption outside their communities. This project uses a historical comparative lens to examine why there were such high rates of separation of indigenous children from their families in the second half of the twentieth century.


This author is represented in the ACLS Humanities E-Book collection.

Publications

A Generation Removed.
A Generation Removed. University of Nebraska Press, 2014.