The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Grants for Critical Editions and Scholarly Translations

The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Program in Buddhist Studies offers an articulated set of fellowship and grant competitions that will expand the understanding and interpretation of Buddhist thought in scholarship and society, strengthen international networks of Buddhist studies, and increase the visibility of innovative currents in those studies.

Grants for Critical Editions and Scholarly Translations support a broad range of endeavor, from the creation of critical editions (with full scholarly apparatus), to translation of canonical texts into modern vernaculars, to the translation of scholarly works on Buddhism from one modern language into another. Both individual and collaborative projects are eligible.

This program is made possible by a generous grant from The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation.

Read more about this fellowship program.

Please note: affiliations shown are as of time of award. Please click on fellows' names for current information.

  • An Annotated English and Italian Translation of Select Chapters of the Pali Sārasaṅgaha | Abstract

    My proposal consists of translating into Italian and English eight chapters of the Pali Sārasaṅgaha, The Collection of the Essence [of the Teaching]. This important 13th/14th century Singhalese text is a compilation of canonical and para-canonical passages dealing with many different topics analysed from a Theravāda Buddhist point of view, that was probably produced for monastic education. It thus represents a precious source of information about the texts and topics that were considered significant in medieval Ceylon and therefore is important for understanding the history of Theravāda Buddhism. The resulting work will be submitted for publication to the Pali Text Society and the Rivista degli Studi Orientali, making it available to scholars and to people interested in Buddhism.

    Chiara Neri
    Chiara Neri

    Independent Scholar, Buddhist Studies

  • An Edition, Translation, and Study of a Gandhari Version of the Sramanyaphala-sutra, the Discourse on the Fruits of Living the Ascetic Life: Senior Kharosthi Manuscript RS 2 | Abstract

    The research proposed will produce for the first time a diplomatic edition, reconstruction, English translation and study of a recently discovered Gandhari version of the Sramanyaphala-sutra, the Discourse on the Fruits of Living the Ascetic Life (Senior Kharosthi manuscript RS 2), which represents a Dharmaguptaka version of an important and popular early canonical discourse (sutra) that has its primary parallels in the Dighanikaya/Dirghagama preserved in Pali, Sanskrit, and Chinese, and in the Sanghabhedavastu of the Mulasarvastivada Vinaya preserved in Sanskrit, Tibetan, and Chinese. The resulting monograph will be published in the Gandharan Buddhist Text series, University of Washington Press, which will make this valuable text available to scholars and the wider public.

    Mark Allon
    Mark Allon

    Senior Lecturer, Indian Subcontinental Studies, University of Sydney, Australia

  • Collaborative Project for Critical Edition and an Annotated Korean Translation of the Cintamayi Bhumi, the Twelfth Chapter of the Basic Section (Mauli Bhumi) of the Yogacarabhumi | Abstract

    The primary aim of this project is to produce a critical edition of the complete Cintamayi Bhumi based on two surviving manuscripts. For those who want to study the Yogacarabhumi corpus, we will be providing a comprehensive view on this important chapter, as well as an improved text based on all available sources. The secondary aim is to encourage Korean Buddhist scholars and students to take an active interest in Buddhist texts written in languages other than classical Chinese. By publishing a Korean translation consulting the Sanskrit and Tibetan equivalents, we will be supplying more understandable interpretations of the enigmatic Chinese terminologies, and thus be reminding readers of the importance of studying Buddhist texts written in languages other than classical Chinese.

    Sungdoo Ahn
    Sungdoo Ahn

    Professor, Department of Philosophy, Seoul National University

    Jin-il Chung
    Jin-il Chung

    Editor, Sanskrit-Wörterbuch, Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Germany

    Hongmi Kim
    Hongmi Kim

    Lecturer, Graduate School of Buddhist Studies and Culture, Dongguk University, South Korea

    Youngjin Lee
    Youngjin Lee

    Assistant Professor, Geumgang University, South Korea

  • Critical Edition of a Collection of Ancient Nyingmapa Buddhist Tamang Ritual Texts in Nepal, with an Ethnographic Analysis of the Main Buddhist Rituals (Death, Ancestors, Apotropaic Rituals and Dedication to Great Religious Masters) | Abstract

    The Tamang form of Mahayana Buddhism developed essentially through the Rnyingmapa and Kagyupa sects of the southern Himalayan Tibetan populations, since the very early periods of expansion of Buddhism in Tibet. Their Buddhism is strongly tinged with a Himalayan form of shamanism, which has for long been assimilated by the Hindus as well as by the Buddhists. We propose to edit, translate and analyze four large collections of texts constituting the pillars of Tamang wisdom; the lKug pa kha chos, or “Symbolic language - Silent language”, the Jig rten gtam chos, or “Folk Stories”, the Rus chen Chyopge (brgyad) or “Book of the Eighteen Large Clans”, and the Rama, or “Songs of Rama” – only small parts of which have been translated into a booklet titled Tamba Kaiten.

    Brigitte Steinmann
    Brigitte Steinmann

    Professor, Institute of Sociology and Anthropology, Université Lille 1, France

    Rajesh Khatiwada
    Rajesh Khatiwada

    , Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales, France

    Thubten Gyalcen Lama
    Thubten Gyalcen Lama

    , Monastery of Rajvir Gompa, Nepal

    Mukta Singh Lama Tamang
    Mukta Singh Lama Tamang

    Adjunct Professor, Nepa School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Nepal

  • The Light of the Three Ages: A Japanese Nun Illumines the Life of the Buddha in India | Abstract

    This project will eventuate in the first English translation of The Light of the Three Ages (Miyo no hikari, ca. 1830). This life of the Buddha was written in neoclassical Japanese, but it reflects deep and critical engagement with biographical sources from the body of Chinese Buddhist canonical literature. Its author, a vinaya expert and nun named Kōgetsu Sōgi (1756-1833), stands out as a rare female author from early modern Japan whose work was put into print in her own day. Corollary aims for this project, to be undertaken primarily at Kyōto University, include (1) research into Kōgetsu’s Chinese-language sources and related eighteenth-century Japanese literature; (2) fieldwork in the (as-yet uncatalogued) archive of the convent which she co-founded; and (3) inquiry into the later history and influence of this book, her life’s work.

    Micah L. Auerback
    Micah L. Auerback

    Associate Professor, Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor