The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collaborative Research Fellowships in Buddhist Studies

The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Program in Buddhist Studies offers an articulated set of fellowship and grant competitions that will expand the understanding and interpretation of Buddhist thought in scholarship and society, strengthen international networks of Buddhist studies, and increase the visibility of innovative currents in those studies.

The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collaborative Research Grants support interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary work encouraging international and multilingual projects. It welcomes projects that relate different Buddhist traditions to each other or that relate scholarship on the broad Buddhist tradition to contemporary concerns in other academic fields.

This program is made possible by a generous grant from The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation.

Read more about this program.

Please note: affiliations shown are as of time of award. Please click on fellows' names for current information.

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Watch "Emerging Themes and Methods of Research: A Discussion with ACLS Fellows," an annual meeting session featuring recent ACLS fellows. 

  • Liberating the Impurities from the Body: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Somatic Experiences among American and Indian Meditators in the Goenka Vipassana Tradition  |  Abstract

    This cross-cultural collaborative project brings together a historical and ethnographic study of the Goenka Vipassana tradition in India and a qualitative study of the range of experiences reported by American Buddhist meditation practitioners. While Vipassana narratives present somatic experiences as a path to liberation attained through the release of psycho-somatic impurities, some practitioners report these experiences as being difficult and distressing. This collaborative project illuminates the range of meditation experiences reported by practitioners in this tradition in both India and the West, and contextualizes the way such experiences are appraised within the historical and social frameworks of these two cultural contexts.

    Jared R. Lindahl
    Jared R. Lindahl

    Visiting Assistant Professor, Cogut Center for the Humanities, Brown University

    Willoughby Britton
    Willoughby Britton

    Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown University

    Daniel M. Stuart
    Daniel M. Stuart

    Assistant Professor, Department of Religious Studies, University of South Carolina

  • Zaya Pandita and Buddhism among the Western Oirat Mongols  |  Abstract

    This proposal is for an eighteen-month, U.S. and Mongolian collaborative research project examining Buddhism among the Western Oirat Mongols. The heart of the project is a scholarly translation and annotation of an extremely important Oirat text. Yet the scope of this research goes far beyond that translation, revealing how and why the Oirad adopted Buddhism, and placing their cultural transformation in the context of many earlier state-led conversions to Buddhism. The completion of this research will contribute to the still small but growing body of knowledge on Buddhism among Central Asian states that were conquered and absorbed by larger imperial enterprises, and whose Buddhist history has been largely lost or forgotten.

    Richard P. Taupier
    Richard P. Taupier

    Affiliated Scholar, Languages, Literatures and Cultures, University of Massachusetts Amherst

    Sukhbaatar Nadmid
    Sukhbaatar Nadmid

    Professor, Mongolian History, Mongolian State University of Education