The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collaborative Research Fellowships in Buddhist Studies

The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Program in Buddhist Studies offers an articulated set of fellowship and grant competitions that will expand the understanding and interpretation of Buddhist thought in scholarship and society, strengthen international networks of Buddhist studies, and increase the visibility of innovative currents in those studies.

The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collaborative Research Grants support interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary work encouraging international and multilingual projects. It welcomes projects that relate different Buddhist traditions to each other or that relate scholarship on the broad Buddhist tradition to contemporary concerns in other academic fields.

This program is made possible by a generous grant from The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation.

Read more about this program.

Please note: affiliations shown are as of time of award. Please click on fellows' names for current information.

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Watch "Emerging Themes and Methods of Research: A Discussion with ACLS Fellows," an annual meeting session featuring recent ACLS fellows. 

  • Buddhist Rebirth Narratives in Literary and Visual Cultures of Gandhara | Abstract

    This project integrates recent studies of Gandharan literary narratives labelled as Avadanas and Purvayogas in early Buddhist manuscripts with visual narratives of reliefs identified as Jatakas in Gandharan sculptures. A comprehensive survey of Jataka reliefs in archives and museum collections of Gandharan art expands knowledge of the visual repertoire and provides an enhanced and authoritative basis for exploring relationships between Buddhist images and texts. A volume on Gandharan literary and visual narratives raises awareness of the multiplicity of Buddhist narrative traditions and elucidates unique sources for popular narratives localized in Gandhara.

    David H. Jongeward
    David H. Jongeward

    Independent Scholar, Royal Ontario Museum

    Timothy J. Lenz
    Timothy J. Lenz

    Adjunct Associate Professor, Asian Languages and Literature, University of Washington

    Jason E. Neelis
    Jason E. Neelis

    Associate Professor, Religion and Culture, Wilfrid Laurier University

  • Communal Jurisdiction of Non-ordained Female Renunciants in the Southern Buddhist Tradition: Myanmar-Burma, Thailand, and Sri Lanka | Abstract

    There are many studies about the monastic rules and regulations of ordained bhikkhunis, however studies about the communal rules currently observed by non-ordained female renunciants in the Southern tradition are lacking. The purpose of this research is to investigate case studies of various communities of Buddhist female renunciants; nunnery schools, institutions, meditation centers, and nuns’ hermitages in Myanmar, Thailand, and Sri Lanka, in order to investigate how they regulate their monastic life and maintain communal cohesion.

    Monica Lindberg Falk
    Monica Lindberg Falk

    Associate Professor, Centre for East and SEAS Studies, Lunds Universitet, Sweden

    Nirmala S. Salgado
    Nirmala S. Salgado

    Professor, Religion, Augustana College (IL)

    Hiroko Kawanami
    Hiroko Kawanami

    Senior Lecturer, Politics, Philosophy and Religion, Lancaster University, UK

  • The Interplay between Buddhist Texts, Images, and Rituals in Mongolian Buddhism | Abstract

    The proposed project consists of two parts. The first part focuses on the study of the relationship between Mongolian Buddhist texts, artistic images, and rituals; and the second part includes a study of the contemporary Mongolian Buddhist art through which the new meanings, ethics, and power of Buddhist themes are articulated in the post-communist Mongolia. By studying both, the traditional and contemporary Buddhist art, we intend to show the ways in which Buddhist images in Mongolia have occupied multiple positions and identities, performed multiple functions in the given social and historical periods, and how they exhibited their capacities to induce new directions in artistic expression and viewing of religious images.

    Uranchimeg Tsultem
    Uranchimeg Tsultem

    Associate Professor, History of Art, National University of Mongolia, Mongolia

    Vesna A. Wallace
    Vesna A. Wallace

    Professor, Religious Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

  • The Two Buddhist Towers: A Multi-Scalar Evaluation of the Practice, Change, and Function of Buddhism at the Regional Angkorian Center of Preah Khan of Kompong Svay, Cambodia (Tenth to Seventeenth C. Ce) | Abstract

    Buddhism is an integral part of Cambodia’s rich cultural past however we lack critical understanding of the religion’s practice, function, and transitions during the Angkorian and Middle periods (9th-18th c. CE) periods. Preah Khan of Kompong Svay, a singularly Buddhist site occupied from the 10th to 17th centuries and home to the Mahayana Preah Thkol and Theravadin Preah Chatomukh towers, represents a unique location to investigate such internal and external dynamics. Combining archaeological, epigraphic and material science this project seeks to conduct a rigorous, multi-scalar assessment of monastic lifeways through time and the intriguing state-level decision of Angkor’s traditionally Brahmanic kings to devote this regional center to Buddhism.

    Christian Fischer
    Christian Fischer

    Assistant Professor, Materials S&E/Getty-UCLA Conservation Program, University of California, Los Angeles

    Mitch Hendrickson
    Mitch Hendrickson

    Assistant Professor, Anthropology, University of Illinois at Chicago